Product categories

Baby walkers

Baby walker

Baby walkers have a frame mounted on wheels or castors that surrounds the infant and which the infant can hold on to.  These products allow infants to stand up and move around on their feet while they are still at the crawling stage or learning to walk. 

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Risks

Child safety experts do not recommend baby walkers, due to the:

  • various serious injuries children can suffer when using them
  • possible delays in learning to walk caused when children frequently use walkers for periods of over 15 minutes at a time.

Infants who can’t walk do not have the skills to identify potential hazards or avoid them quickly enough, so parents or carers must always supervise infants in baby walkers.

Injuries

Children can suffer head injuries and other serious injuries such as fractures if the baby walker they’re in tips over or falls down stairs. Head injuries are the most frequent and serious injuries associated with baby walkers.

Access to dangerous items

 Children in baby walkers can also gain access to hazardous areas that they normally can’t reach, such as:

  • bench tops where children may find hot food or drinks or sharp objects
  • kitchen utensil drawers where sharp objects are stored
  • ovens and other appliances that can cause burns.

To minimise these risks, there is a mandatory standard for baby walkers.

Mandatory Standards

Mandatory Standards

This mandatory standard came into effect on 15 February 2013. It covers design, construction, performance and labelling requirements for baby walkers.
Recalls

Recalls

Check www.recalls.gov.au for any recalls related to this page.

Statistics

  • 135 injury cases related to baby-walker were reported by public hospital emergency departments between 2000 and 2008 in Victoria alone
  • an average of 25 injury cases per year related to babywalkers were reported in Victoria alone before the mandatory standard for baby walkers was introduced in November 2002. Since the standard came into place, this number has dramatically dropped to 12.4 cases per year

Source: Victorian Emergency Minimum Dataset

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