Takata NADI 5-AT airbag recall FAQs

The following frequently asked questions provide consumers with further information about the Takata NADI 5-AT airbag recall.

Defects and hazards

What are the defects?

Faulty Takata airbags containing a non-azide driver inflator (NADI) that use 5-aminotetrazole (5-AT) propellant may allow moisture to enter the unit and degrade the airbag propellant due to poorly attached and inadequate sealing tape. If this occurs, the properties of the propellant may be changed so that the propellant does not react as intended during an accident, causing misdeployment of the airbag.

What evidence has been provided to manufacturers to demonstrate that the airbags are dangerous?

Joyson Safety System, Takata’s successor, has provided a report explaining the defect to the ACCC; manufacturers; and the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications. The company has also filed a defect report with the US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

What are the hazards?

If a vehicle with an affected airbag is involved in a collision, the airbag may misdeploy, causing sharp metal fragments to propel out of the airbag at high speed, resulting in serious injuries or death to vehicle occupants.

There is also a potential risk that the airbag may under-inflate in a collision and may not protect the driver as intended.

Affected vehicles

Are affected vehicles being recalled?

About 78 000 Audi, BMW, Ford, Honda, Mazda, Mitsubishi, Suzuki and Toyota vehicles manufactured between 1996 and 2000 may be fitted with these dangerous Takata airbags. While it is expected that many of these vehicles will no longer be in use, a substantial number of affected vehicles are likely to be still registered and in use.

The Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications assisted by the ACCC, negotiated voluntary recalls with the eight affected manufacturers.

If any voluntary recalls are not effectively carried out, the ACCC may recommend alternative options, including a compulsory recall, to the Minister.

What vehicles are affected?

Certain models of Audi, Ford, Honda, Mazda, Mitsubishi, Suzuki and Toyota vehicles manufactured between 1996 and 2000 may be affected. See Recall of Takata NADI 5-AT airbags for make, model and year details. Consumers are encouraged to monitor the Product Safety Australia website for any updates.

How can I check if my car is affected?

Consumers can check if their car is affected by visiting:

  • IsMyAirbagSafe.com.au and entering their state/territory and number plate
  • the vehicle manufacturer’s website and entering their VIN number in the recall search tool or by contacting them direct for information
  • the Product Safety Australia website Recall of Takata NADI 5-AT airbags page for a list of affected vehicle makes, models and model years.

Consumers should also subscribe to the Product Safety Australia newsletter to receive email updates as new information about recalls is published.

If your vehicle is affected

Should I still drive my car?

Drivers should be aware of the serious safety risk if they have an affected car. If possible, consumers should consider other transport options.

What should I do if my car is affected?

If you identify that you have an affected vehicle you should:

  • check if your vehicle is under recall: BMW, Audi, Ford, Honda, Mazda, Mitsubishi, Suzuki and Toyota vehicles are subject to recall, and you should respond to the recall urgently
  • contact your vehicle manufacturer’s head office (contact details at Recall of Takata NADI 5-AT airbags) and arrange a free inspection to check if your car is fitted with a NADI 5-AT airbag. Your vehicle manufacturer will arrange alternative transport options with you if required.

My airbags were replaced as part of the compulsory Takata airbag recall — could I still be affected?

Yes, your vehicle could be affected. NADI 5-AT inflators are used in front driver’s side airbags only. Some vehicles may have different types of driver and passenger airbag inflators installed. For example, your vehicle may have had a passenger airbag with a phase-stabilised ammonium nitrate (PSAN) inflator and a driver’s airbag with a NADI 5-AT inflator. If your PSAN passenger airbag inflator was replaced, you may still have a NADI 5-AT inflator in your driver’s side airbag.

You should contact your vehicle manufacturer's head office directly to provide your vehicle information and current contact details, and arrange an inspection to see if the affected airbag is fitted in your vehicle.

My driver’s side airbag was replaced under the compulsory Takata airbag recall — could it have been replaced with a NADI 5-AT airbag?

NADI 5-AT airbag inflators were manufactured between May 1995 and August 1999 and were fitted in vehicles with models years between 1996 and 2000.

It is very unlikely that that your driver’s side airbag replaced under the compulsory Takata airbag recall was replaced with a Takata NADI 5-AT airbag due to the age of these airbags.

You should still contact your vehicle manufacturer directly to provide your vehicle information, current contact details and arrange an inspection to see if a NADI 5-AT airbag is fitted.

Can’t I just disable the airbag?

No, you should not disconnect, disable or remove the airbag.

Airbags are a supplemental protection mechanism that are designed to work best in tandem with seat belts.

Additionally, if the airbag is disconnected then the vehicle may be considered by road safety authorities as not roadworthy, which may compromise eligibility for registration or insurance. This is unfortunate, however Australian lawmakers couldn’t have predicted this situation arising.

Manufacturers and spare parts

What are manufacturers doing to address the issue?

Most manufacturers are offering to buyback vehicles. Some are offering a buyback or replacement airbag, and others are offering a replacement airbag only. All manufacturers are offering alternative transportation if required for affected consumers until the buyback process is completed or replacement airbags are available.

When will spare parts be available?

Manufacturers who are offering replacement airbags will contact you directly when replacement airbags are available. The ACCC and the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications are seeking ongoing updates from manufacturers on the availability of replacement airbags.

Why does it take so long for spare parts to be available? Can’t they just replace the faulty airbag with new parts or different airbags?

Due to the age of the affected vehicles, it may not be possible for the manufacturer to replace the faulty airbag with new parts or a different airbag.

For this reason, manufacturers that are offering replacement parts need to commission the design, testing, certification and production of replacement airbag inflators.

COVID-19 may also impact the availability and frequency of international air and sea freight to deliver replacement airbag inflators.

Honda is now offering replacement parts — why has it taken so long?

At the commencement of the voluntary recall, Honda did not have access to replacement parts and so could only offer a buyback option. Honda has now secured replacement parts and can offer this remedy instead.

Honda will provide affected consumers with a vehicle for the period until replacements parts become available.

What if I already accepted a buyback offer even though I wanted to keep my car?

Honda acted on the information it had at the time of voluntarily recalling affected vehicles and in the interests of consumer safety.

Once the buyback has been completed, vehicles are destroyed and sold for scrap materials and cannot be returned.

If you have very recently accepted a buyback offer but would prefer to wait for a replacement airbag, you can contact the Honda Australia Recall Call Centre on 1800 952 272 to check if your vehicle is still available.

I have been informed that my 1996-2000 Honda Civic/1998-1999 Odyssey/2000 Integra is now affected by the recall — why wasn’t I told sooner?

Honda acted on the information it had at the time of voluntarily recalling affected vehicles. New information available to Honda indicates that these vehicles are potentially fitted with a faulty Takata NADI 5-AT airbag inflator.

You should contact the Honda Australia Recall Call Centre on 1800 952 272 to organise a free urgent vehicle inspection.

Honda will provide affected consumers with a vehicle for the period until replacements parts become available.

If your vehicle is identified as not containing a Takata NADI 5-AT airbag inflator, no further action is required.

What if I'm not happy with their remedy?

If you are not happy with the remedy offered by your vehicle dealer, contact the vehicle manufacturer’s head office. If you are still not satisfied, you can contact the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications or the ACCC.

The ACCC and the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications expect manufacturers to negotiate fairly with affected consumers and be considerate of each consumer’s individual circumstances.

For information about consumer guarantees, visit Consumer guarantees.

The ACCC and regulators

When did the ACCC become aware of this issue?

Safety authorities in Australia, Japan and the United States recently identified a pattern of abnormal airbag deployments involving BMW vehicles.

Following the identification of a defective NADI 5-AT airbag in a BMW vehicle as the suspected cause of a fatal injury in September 2019, and the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications assisted by the ACCC, engaged with BMW to negotiate an urgent recall.

Immediately following notification of the BMW recall in early November 2019, the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications contacted all vehicle manufacturers to determine which other vehicles in Australia may be affected.

Once affected manufacturers were identified, Infrastructure, with the ACCC’s assistance, commenced recall negotiations.

Why did it take so long for some vehicle manufacturers to issue a recall notice?

Manufacturers say their delay in beginning a recall relates to various issues, including understanding the cause of the issue, the identification of vehicle identification numbers and vehicles containing these type of airbags due to their age, and the lack of availability of inflators to replace them.

How can the ACCC be sure that there are no other dangerous airbags in the market?

The ACCC is closely monitoring relevant international developments and research, particularly in the United States to ensure we stay informed of further potential airbag safety issues that could affect Australian consumers.

How many deaths and injuries are associated with these airbags?

The ACCC is aware of four suspected misdeployments of these inflators in Australia, including two deaths and two serious injuries.

Is the defect in these airbags confined to old Takata airbags?

The ACCC has received advice from Joyson Safety Systems (successor of Takata Corporation) that states NADI 5-AT inflators with this defect were manufactured between May 1995 and August 1999. Based on current information from manufacturers, the ACCC understand these inflators were installed in vehicles up until 2000.

Who is the responsible regulator?

The Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications negotiates voluntary recalls of motor vehicles, with assistance from the ACCC.

What is the role of the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications?

The Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications is the national regulator responsible for road vehicle safety standards, including safety, when first supplied to the Australian market. The Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications and the ACCC work collaboratively under a Memorandum of Understand (MoU).

The Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications is the main point of contact for suppliers that have voluntarily recalled road vehicles, takes the lead in monitoring recall progress and engages with suppliers about improving their recall strategies.

Vehicles supplied in Australia must meet particular specifications outlined in the Australian Design Rules (ADRs) which are the national vehicle safety standards – most new road vehicles must comply with at the time of manufacture and first supply to the Australian market.

What is the Minister doing about this issue?

The ACCC is keeping its Minister informed of the issue and the progress of voluntary recall negotiations being undertaken by the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications and the ACCC with the affected manufacturers.

If a manufacturer does not take satisfactory action to prevent these vehicles from causing injury to drivers and/or passengers, the ACCC may recommend the Minister issue a compulsory recall.

What is happening around the world/other regulators?

The US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) publicly announced on 4 December 2019 that Takata (TK Global LLC) is working with vehicle manufacturers to identify vehicles with NADI 5-AT airbags. A recall of approximately 1.4 million affected vehicles has commenced in the United States. These vehicles were made by Audi, BMW, Honda, Mitsubishi, Toyota and Isuzu.

The recall

What is the difference between a voluntary recall and the compulsory recall?

A voluntary recall is initiated by the supplier. A compulsory recall is ordered by the responsible Minister.

A compulsory recall specifies the manner and timing of the recall activity, which may be different to recall activity under voluntary recalls. Suppliers may face penalties if they don’t meet the requirements in the compulsory recall.

How is this different to the compulsory Takata airbag recall?

The airbags affected by this issue do not contain the same chemical components as those affected by the compulsory recall.

The affected airbags were only manufactured between May 1995 and August 1999 until a design change and process improvement was implemented to the foil seal tape which more effectively prevented moisture from getting in.

The compulsory Takata recall provides for loan and hire cars — will the same apply for these recalls?

The ACCC and the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications worked with affected manufacturers to negotiate appropriate remedies for consumers. Manufacturers will offer loan and hire cars, or reimbursement for alternative transportation costs, until the buyback process is completed or replacement parts are available.

Will there be a compulsory recall for Takata airbags with NADI 5-AT?

If a manufacturer does not take satisfactory action to prevent these vehicles from causing injury to drivers and/or passengers, the ACCC may recommend the Minister issue a compulsory recall.

More information

Recall of Takata NADI 5-AT airbags